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Read now for fun & frugal #birthdayparty ideas! via manyhatsmommy.com


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The Minimalist Guide to Birthdays: Fun Activities

This month we’ve been talking about birthday parties with less fuss. Note, I did NOT say less fun! You can give your kids a great birthday party without spending lots of money. If you are just joining the party, pun intended, start over here at post #1.

Your children  can have lots of fun with a few dollar store purchases, items around the house, and things you borrow from friends and family. Here’s a list to get you started. Continue reading

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Grab ideas for frugal and easy #birthdayparty decorations & snacks! via manyhatsmommy.com


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The Minimalist Guide to Birthdays: Easy Decorations & Snacks

Last week we started the “Minimalist’s Guide to Birthdays” series. I explained why I’m doing the series and discussed birthday party mom-guilt. Another reason we have minimalist parties in our home that I forgot to mention is that it cuts down on overstimulation for Dr. J.

Today we’re talking easy decorations and snacks. Let’s get started! Continue reading

3 Ways to Organize your Kids via ManyHatsMommy.com


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3 Ways to Organize your Kids

This post contains affiliate links. I receive a small commission from any items you purchase from those links. I recommend those products because I truly like them.

Matthew Newell of the Family Hope Center says our kids with ADD, autism, etc. need more structure in their day, not less. It helps them make it through the day. I have seen that true in Dr. J’s life, but I confess I’m not always the greatest at it.

“So why,” you ask, “do you say ‘help is here!'”?

Because I’ve found some things that helped Dr. J. It’s just my fault for not being consistent, or the needs in our family changed and I moved on to something else.

Here are three things that add structure to our home that have helped Dr. J.:

Perhaps they will help you to, or you can modify them to work in your home.

1. Dollar Store Sentence Strips

These are great for making a daily schedule, a school schedule, reminders–you are limited only by your imagination! I already wrote a post about this, so instead of reiterating it, you can read more here.

2. Over-the-Door Shoe Organizer

If you look at organizing boards on Pinterest, you’ll find lots of ideas for shoe organizers. I don’t remember if I came up with this idea or my sister did, but it has worked well. The boys helped me put it together. Their room was a minefield of crayons, markers, scissors, and of course toys, so I hung this on the back of their door.

3 Ways to Organize Your Child via ManyHatsMommy.com

You need a shoe organizer, blank address labels, a pen, and your supplies. I used labels to avoid the “I-can’t-find-a-red-crayon” dilemma. You’ll see that I added some visual cues for my five year-old, like using the color of the crayon to write the word or the drawing of scissors. Their room is not as spotless as a surgery center, but it is much-improved since I did this, and we haven’t had arguing over who has crayons in their desk and who doesn’t. You can adapt this for lots of things!

3. Well Planned Day Student Planner

This worked really well, and I’m going to return to it in August or September. I used Well Planned Day’s student planner for Dr. J. I used it both for school AND home. If checklists make your child more comfortable and confident, then this will work really well for him. On the left side I put school assignments. These were things that if he completed, he earned five minutes of computer time for each check. The emphasis was on completion, not correctness. If he didn’t finish something, I crossed it out and he didn’t get to earn minutes for that item. This method controls tech time, gives structure, shows accomplishment, and more.

3 Ways to Organize your Kids via ManyHatsMommy.com

On the right side, I put things that Dr. J. has to do just because he’s alive–self-care, home tasks, etc. He didn’t earn any tech time for these. It’s simply a way for him to see what needs to be done and help him remember. I can refer him back to his planner if he’s off track or I know there’s something he’s supposed to be doing. Fewer raised voices and more productivity. I’d say that’s a good thing.

Now it’s your turn. What have you used with your children to help them stay on track or be more organized? Do tell!


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Fall Recipe–Thanksgiving No-Bake Cookies

Robin shared this recipe that looks like a great project for kids! She says:

Time to decorate for Thanksgiving and start gathering recipes.

These cookies have been our family tradition for almost 20 years now. Making them is a special time the children look forward to every Thanksgiving. Giving them to neighbors and friends is just as fun.

No Bake Turkey Cookies

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Wednesday’s Woman–Mikki Rogers

I found today’s Wednesday’s Woman on Twitter, and she’s about to take off on an amazing adventure around the world! And now, here is Mikki in her own words…

I see myself as just another woman who has a strong desire to make a difference in the world.  I am honored to be a part of Wednesday’s Woman.

My name is Mikki Rogers and I love to dabble in lots of things such as cooking, reading, decorating and singing.  But there is nothing I love better than being a mom.  I am a proud mother of 4 beautiful children and an even prouder grandma of 3, almost 4, gorgeous grandchildren.  I feel blessed in my life to have been able to stay home all the years I had my kids home to raise and nurture them. Continue reading


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Marshmallow Fun!

Today I’m going to share some ideas of what you can do with marshmallows–cheap, easy fun to help over the summer! For those of us whose children have sensory-seeking or sensory-avoidance, marshmallows offer a sensory exercise. Working with mini marshmallows helps fine motor skills. The second activity also gives kids time to sharpen planning/organizing skills, while the third activity provides social skills practice in a comfortable setting. Continue reading